“…his lack of interest in honours, in recognition and in the normal trappings of success was sobering.”

Mark Halle, Director, Trade and Investment Program International Institute for Sustainable Development

Heroes are people we not only admire, but whom in many ways we use as models. In that sense, Konrad was a hero. I not only admired him, but studiously sought to imitate his fine balance between professional rigour and outward casualness; his propensity to surprise and delight; his attempt to look behind what everyone was saying to find a more interesting and ultimately more useful perspective on an issue. “Thinking out of the box” has become a cliché, but surprisingly few people are really able to do it. Konrad did it as a way of life, as a game, as a source of fun.

It was easy to look up to Konrad—physically of course, but also in terms of what he was. For someone as wise and worldly, his lack of interest in honours, in recognition and in the normal trappings of success was sobering. His patrician background and his cosmopolitan sophistication might have predisposed him to a more classical academic itinerary. Instead, he sought one thing only in his professional life—the luxury to think and to work on the issues that he found fascinating. No title, no swollen income, no guarantee of comfort could replace this priority, at least in his professional life.

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